List of Management Theories and their Founders

List of Management Theories and their Founders

Theories + Models Founder
Different Managerial Roles Henry Mintzberg's
Scientific Management Frederick W. Taylor
Principles of Administration Management Henry Fayol
[Read more]
Theory Z of Motivation by William Ochi

Theory Z of Motivation by William Ochi

Prof William Ouchi (1981) identified the characteristics of Japanese and American Organizations. In course of his research, he found that there were several successful American companies that exhibited characteristics of both America and Japanese companies, he called the marriage of American and Japanese management techniques Theory Z. He noted that these companies did not consciously emulate the Japanese management styles but they evolved from a desire to improve. The marriage of the two styles and the growth of Theory Z explained in the following Table:
American Managerial Practices Japanese Managerial Practices Theory Z
Short-term Employment Lifetime Employment Long-term Employment
[Read more]
Approaches to the Study of Management

Approaches to the Study of Management

Human Relations(Interpersonal Behaviour) Approach:

  • This method is based on the idea that managing involves getting things done through people and therefore, its study should be centered on interpersonal relationships. Variously called the human relations, leadership or behavioural science approach, this school concentrates on the human aspect of management. Motivation, Psychology, leadership and human interactions form bulk of the theory.

Group Behavioural Approach:

  • This approach is concemed primarily with the behaviour of  people in groups rather than behaviour of individuals. Many of the problems in managing stem from group behaviour patterns, attitudes and desires. It is based on sociology and social
[Read more]
Contribution by Management Scientists - 1792 to till date

Contribution by Management Scientists - 1792 to till date

Scientific management is that kind of management through which business is conducted according to the standards established on the basis of facts gained through systematic observation, experiment or reasoning. The following are some of the individuals who were instrumental in the development of scientific management.

Charles Babbage (1792-1871): 
He was a proponent of the specialization of labour. He advocated that managers should conduct time studies to determine how long it should take for each specialized task.
[Read more]
14 Principles of Management by Henry Fayol

14 Principles of Management by Henry Fayol

Henry Fayol (1841-1925), who was born in 1841 in France, can be rightly called the "father of modern management theory". He became an engineer and subsequently, the chief executive of a large coal and steel combine.

He developed some principles and techniques of management. He came to the conclusion from his experience that there could be a "single administrative science', the principles of which can be universally applied not only to business but also to political, religious and other undertakings. That is why he is called the "Universalist".
[Read more]
Scientific Management by Frederick W. Taylor

Scientific Management by Frederick W. Taylor

F.W.Taylor (1856-1915) is called the father of scientific management. He laid emphasis on the necessity of accepting the scientific approach in the management of an organisation. He was primarily concerned with the efficiency of workers and optimum utilisation of machines and other resources in order to bring up a sound enterprise. Taylor, who worked in different capacities in the mining industry, saw the urgent necessity elimination of wastage, which was rampant in industrial organisations.
  • He felt that the only way to avoid wastage and achieve efficiency would be to apply scientific methods in the field of management. Scientific management implies the application of science
[Read more]
Henry Mintzberg's Managerial roles

Henry Mintzberg's Managerial roles

To fulfil the multiple functional responsibilities, managers assume multiple roles. A role is an organized set of behaviours. Henry Mintzberg has identified ten roles common to the work of all managers. 
  • The ten roles are divided into three groups:
    • Interpersonal, 
    • Informational and 
    • Decisional. 
The in role-of-manager formational roles link all managerial work together.

The interpersonal roles ensure that information is provided. 

The decisional roles make significant use of the information.
[Read more]